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How to install Microstack on Virtualbox with Ubuntu guest OS

MicroStack is an OpenStack distribution for Ubuntu, which is suitable for the deployment of fully functional OpenStack on a single machine. Installation is quite straightforward.

My environment

  • Host system: Win 10 Pro 64bit
  • VirtualBox 6.1.25r 64bit
  • Guest System:
    • clear server install of Ubuntu 20.04.3 :LTS with bridged networking
    • 4GB of RAM
    • 4 vPCU
    • 100GB of HDD (the size is officially recommended, but mainly is used for hosting virtual VMs)

    Single node installation steps using snap

    Official guides use the snap system, where all applications are packaged with all their dependencies. All the microstack installation is relatively fast, taking no more than 15 minutes.

How to install Microstack on VMware with Ubuntu guest OS

Microstack is a pure upstream OpenStack distribution. It includes core OpenStack services and the most popular compute, network and storage options. Installation is fast and easy to perform.

My enviroment

  • VMware ESXI 6.7.0
  • Guest system:
    • server install of Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS
    • static public IP address
    • 16GB RAM (8GB recommended)
    • 4 vCPU
    • 100GB of HDD (actual installation with one tiny instace of cirros running takes about 8GB of storage)

    Single-node installation steps using snap

    Official documentation uses the snap system for installation. The installation, together with initialization, will take about 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your internet speed and HW specification.

Multi tabbed, multi execution telnet/ssh clients

Working on our practical networking lessons our students and I, as their teacher, we are usually configuring several routers and switches (sometimes up to ten), which are accessible remotely. For this, we welcome the use of multi-tabbed and especially multi execution clients.

They allow us to eficiently organize working space and run commands in one task on all connected network equipments (for example to save running config).

KIS 2019 network traffic dataset

KIS 2019 network traffic dataset

  • Authors : Jana Uramová, Tomáš Mokoš, Patrik Rodina, Peter Seemann, Miroslav Kohútik

This article describes the KIS 2019 network traffic dataset. If you wish to access this dataset, contact us by e-mail at dataset[AT]kis.fri.uniza.sk.

The KIS 2019 dataset was created by Tomáš Mokoš as a part of his Diploma thesis at the Department of Information Networks on the University of Žilina’s Faculty of Management Science and Informatics.

How to later integrate Solar-Putty with GNS3 as the preferred console application

Starting the GNS3 version 2.1.10, Solar-Putty is packaged as the default SSH client. However, how to integrate it to GNS3 later? As it was not selected during the GNS3 installation? Follow:

1. Download the Solar Putty application from https://www.solarwinds.com/free-tools/solar-putty. Puty is zipped, therefore after the download has completed, unzip the Solar-PuTTY.exe application file to your preferred application folder. I used the C:\Program Files (x86)\Solar-Putty\ for that.

Tools for a quick SIP diagnostics – ngrep, sipgrep and sngrep

Sometimes there is a need for simple and quick analysis or the troubleshooting of a SIP server and its call functions. Of course, we should use the well-known tcpdump, mentioned in the article Using tcpdump for SIP diagnostics. However, for some occasional Linux users this may be too difficult and unclear. Actually there exist some simpler utilities,, that could work fine, as ngrep, and for me newer sipgrep and sngrep (love at first sight).

All utils are directly available and can be installed online from Debian repo using apt-get install ngrep sipgrep sngrep.

Using tcpdump for SIP diagnostics

TCPdump is a powerful command-line packet analyzer, which may be used for a SIP message sniffing/analyzing. TCPdump is preinstalled on many linux distributions, or may be installed directly from debian repository:

apt-get install tcpdump

TCPdump allows write sniff to a file or display it realtime. Its usage for SIP message analysis may look like:

How to easily add Open vSwitch to GNS3

Open vSwitch (OVS) is a multilayer (MLS) virtual switch licensed under the open-source Apache 2.0 license which is widely used in the field of virtual networking. With this open-source MLS switch, we can easily extend GNS3 switching capabilities. We can add this switch to GNS3 very quickly using a GNS3 OVS appliance. No base Linux system VM is required, no ISO images.

In this post I’m going to describe how to add and run OVS MLS inside of the GNS3 (local or remote).

Juniper vSRX as a router

The Juniper vSRX firewall can be operated and configured as a router. The reasons may be various, the use in GNS3 may include that vSRX has a smaller memory footprint or non-separated data and control plane. So. to do this, you must :

set system host-name ABC
set system root-authentication plain-text-password PASSWORD

And then change the packet processing mode from flow-based to packet-based: